Best Salmon Fishing Tackle

Salmon has been a prime prize for fishermen all around the world. The seven different species lend to a variety of delicious dishes, and their widespread habitat allows fishermen to find them in streams and salt water alike. You can use whatever type of lure you feel comfortable with when you go fishing. But if you want to make sure you get some salmon on your hook, try one of these three fishing tackles.

Trolling Lures

Trolling lures work great when you know exactly what type of salmon you’re fishing for. Green colors work great for salmon. Ultraviolet colors attract all types of salmon at all depths. How fast you’re trolling is going to determine how many fish you catch, most fish swim at 1 mph per inch of length. A 6-inch fish will generally swim 6 mph. Experiment with different RPM speeds to see what get the fish going crazy. The direction your boat is sailing in (up wind or down wind) affects the speed and depth of your troll, so always be conscience of your direction. Make sure you have a strong fishing line, and let out anywhere between 100 and 200 feet of line behind your boat. Steer in gentle “S” curves to attract more attention from fish. Don’t go for more than 15 minutes without changing or checking your lure.

Best Salmon Fishing Tackle

Flashtrap Spinners

Flashtrap spinners have been a solid salmon slayer for beginners and professionals for many years. Many charter captains swear by them when looking for salmon in saltwater. They also work exceptionally well in lakes and streams. They are extremely effective on King and Silver salmon. They come designed with single or treble hooks and the wide variety of colors makes them a must-have for any salmon fisher’s tackle box.

Best Salmon Fishing Tackle

Salmon’s Eggs

Salmon’s eggs have been used by fishermen to entice salmon for ages. King and Silver salmon simply go crazy over them. They come in two different forms: salmon skein and loose eggs. A salmon skein is basically hundreds of salmon eggs bunched together to form one piece of salmon skein. If you use skeins, you’re going to have to cut them to the size of your choice, or break them down to loose eggs. Hook your Salmon egg and attach a small weight above the hook. There should be at least 10 to 12 inches between the hook and weight. Depending on where you are fishing, you can let the stream carry your bait, or let it sit and wait for the fish to start biting.

Best Salmon Fishing Tackle